Simulcast signal behavior at the receiver

Posted by on Feb 16, 2012 in Blog, Simulcast | 0 comments

Simulcast signal behavior at the receiver

[latexpage] In my previous post on simulcast in paging, I mainly took a high level view of the system overall. In this post, I’m going to drill in a bit deeper at the receiver. To start simply, let’s assume we’re dealing with a relatively low data rate binary FSK scheme, like POCSAG at 512 or 1200 bit/s. In this case, the bit time is the symbol time, something like 1 to 2ms or so. Considering the speed of radio signals, at $ 300 \times 10^{6 }m\cdot s^{-1}$ the “length of a bit” will be around 150 to 300km. What this means is that radio signals will have every...

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Simulcasting in paging

Posted by on Feb 13, 2012 in Blog, Simulcast | 2 comments

Simulcasting in paging

Simulcasting is perhaps the most arcane subject in all of land mobile radio communications. In William C. Jakes’ classic volume, Microwave Mobile Communications, simulcast receives no treatment at all. The first edition, dated 1974, certainly post-dated POCSAG, which goes back to 1982. The second IEEE edition, dated 1994, post-dated Golay and FLEX digital paging. There seems little reason to gloss over simulcast in this way. Finally, in 2010, Springer-Verlag published Wireless Personal Communications: Research Developments, edited by Woerner, Rappaport, and Reed; and this included in...

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Paging, what’s so different?

Posted by on Jun 16, 2010 in Blog, Simulcast | 0 comments

Paging, what’s so different?

One often finds an impression about paging, relative to other forms of wireless communication available now (say cellular in any of its forms, or WiFi), in which paging is viewed as an old and dead technology. It is “narrowband” in a world of increasingly “broadband” communication methods. A bigger, broader data pipe is almost universally seen as superior. On this blog, I adopt the contrarian point of view. Having worked for decades both in cellular and paging, I think that I can present a more balanced point of view than others. I believe that it is extremely rare to...

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